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pretty-foxy

pretty-foxy

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A Treatise on Pants

Dammit, I just ripped another pair of jeans. Yes in the same place. Top of the leg, thigh side. Damn it.

Trivial you say? Well, yes, it is indeed. But on the other hand, I've never heard of someone else having this problem. Oh yes, jeans wear, slowly, but they don't thin and fail. Not like they do for me. At least, no one else I know has fessed up to it.

But I'm not trying to bore you with "Trite Inconveniences From Blair's Life." That's next season. No, I have a theory. And I think it has to do with wash intervals.

You see, the nicer a woven material is, even denim, the thinner each individual fabric is (even if you need many more to reinforce the garment.) However, as you wear fabrics, denim especially, it loosens up. The constant pulls and tensions of everyday life start to pull apart the weave. Now, in and of itself, this isn't a bad thing- oftentimes pants will be too tight the first time you wear them, then nice for a couple of wears or so until wash time.

But the more wears between washes, normally not a problem with jeans as long as you don't abuse it (ahem, self, I'm looking at you), the material gets looser. Eventually you can start to see more light through the weave then you would expect; certain patches of high tensile wear start to thin out, get softer. And then, in one not-so-stressful pull, you get a rip. An annoying stress rip, one that can't seamlessly be repaired. Not that you'd really want to, seeing as by that time the entire region (and often many more) are in the same state, which would lead to replacing the pants from the inside out, not an efficient system.

My first reaction to this theory is how counter intuitive it seems: with the exception of strenuous activity, most of the time the thing that is hardest on clothes is washing them. It's one reason it pays to be gentle and thoughtful when you do the wash, at least if you don't want your things to look like they came out of the bottom of a Salvation Army $1 bin. But I think I can reconcile this piece of data. New pants, no matter how long between washes, don't exhibit this wear pattern. They need to have at least been broken in for this to occur. I hypothesize that, because clothing gets much of its tensile strength from having a tight mesh, it actually gets weaker the longer between washes. At first, this isn't an issue; most clothes are more than tough enough to withstand a couple of wearings of good stretches. But everytime you go beyond that, there may very well be more damage done to the individual threads in the mesh: because they are relatively farther away from their mates, they must do more work.


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"I was a tool of Satan"

http://www.cjr.org/issues/2003/6/satan-marlette.asp

Highly recommended article from the Colombia Journalism Review. Very interesting points, which I need some time to mull over. Would be interested in any of your opinions.


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Bridge

Bridge

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A question

If now's as good a time as any, does that imply that it's also as bad a time as any?


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They're made out of Meat

This is very well done. I really need to get back in to making videos/movies.

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innocence

innocence is fragile

easily broken

and rarely replaced

-Erin Lindsey


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VeeP

As a serious political theory question, what is the point of the Vice President in the post 12th Amendment era? I actually very much like the idea of a loser being in a position of at least some responsibilty: it helps to prevent tyranny from any party that might get a majority, and in my mind it also is a small step towards helping minor parties advance.

But, since the VP is now, for all intents and purposes, a Presidential appointee (albeit one appointed before an election), why should we bother about direct election? The role is very poorly defined, and it would be easy enough to change the line of succsion to another elected candidate. That way, if the President wants a top advisor or administrator, he can appoint one, as it is now.

It's not a large issue by any means, but in my mind is simple political clutter. It was a good idea to help limit the executive branch; but one that, in the early years of party politics, was found too annoying by the parties and thus done away with. Either bring it back to what it was, or eliminate the position as anything except an appointee. It would recognize the truth of the situation and it would also give the Senate another position to block if they would so choose.


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invention

"The great thing about reinventing the wheel is that you get to make a round one."

-Douglas Crockford


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potential

"Whom the Gods wish to destroy, they first call promising."
-Cyril Connolly


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